Omar Kilani, Ashes to Ashes

Omar Kilani, Ashes to Ashes, pencil drawing on paper, 30×42 cm.

(Ashes to ashes )
Do you remember a guy that’s been
In such an early song?
I’ve heard a rumor from Ground Control
Oh no, don’t say it’s true
They got a message from the Action Man
“I’m happy, hope you’re happy too
I’ve loved all I’ve needed, love
Sordid details following”
The shrieking of nothing is killing, just
Pictures of Jap girls in synthesis and I
Ain’t got no money and I ain’t got no hair
But I’m hoping to kick but the planet it’s glowing
Ashes to ashes, funk to funky
We know Major Tom’s a junkie
Strung out in heaven’s high
Hitting an all-time low
Time and again I tell myself
I’ll stay clean tonight
But the little green wheels are following me
Oh no, not again
I’m stuck with a valuable friend
“I’m happy, hope you’re happy too”
One flash of light but no smoking pistol.

The exhibition is still on virtual display:

Kilani and his work at GO Gallery
Kilani and his work at GO Gallery

GO Gallery is open again, Thursdays – Saturdays.

After being in India for 2¬Ĺ months, including a lockdown for one month, we are back and the GO Gallery is open again.
The exhibition that we started in January, ‘The Private Collection’, was a big succes, most pieces were sold.
Our private collection is large enough to create a new exhibition. And that’s what we did.
A selection of the collectable art works that we bought through the last 3 decades are on display and for sale.
We want to share our love with you.
The gallery is open from Thursday – Saturday.
Do you prefer to make an appointment and enjoy the exhibition alone or a different time?
Don’t hesitate to call us!

Winter time @ GO Gallery

Until the end of winter, the GO Gallery is only open on Fridays and Saturdays.
The friends of ASA, Amsterdam Street Art will be present during our absence.
In the meantime, Farud and Oscar enjoy their stay in Asia.
The exhibition “The Private Collection” can be seen in the gallery until 28 March.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The exhibition is a retrospective.
From almost all exhibitions, the owners Farud and Oscar have purchased an artwork for their private collection.
Due to a lack of space, part of this collection is now being exhibited and sold.

I F****D Mickey. Minnies’s Revenge! Exhibition by Robert J. Halls. December 1, 2018

On December 1, GO Gallery opened the second solo exhibition by Robert J. Halls.
After the unprecedented success in 2016 of ‘F ** K Mickey’, his work gets a sequel in Minnie’s Revenge:

I F****D Mickey

Robert J. Halls was trained as a couturier, he studied at the London School of Fashion and designed costumes for stage, film, TV and music stars and the Royal Shakespeare Company.

After a successful career, he became frustrated by the fashion industry and started drawing and painting. This passion created the ultimate career change.
After completing a course at the Putney School of Art and the Open University he became a full-time artist and his work was exhibited in galleries and art fairs in London, Brighton and Amsterdam.

Both Mickey and Minnie Mouse were born 90 years ago in 1928 from the brain of Walt Disney. Mickey can be seen everywhere in art, but his girlfriend Minnie is much less visible, but she did become the muse of Robert J. Halls. Halls soon started making portraits of her.

The paintings of the old masters he had seen and studied in the Rijksmuseum, The National Gallery, the Prado and the palaces of Versailles, formed the basis of his own work. He loved the hidden meanings in the paintings of famous women and religious icons. The techniques that they applied to the canvas in oil paint hit him the most and were an eye-opener for him.

He copied paintings by Peter Paul Rubens, Francois Boucher and other masters and portrayed Minnie in the capacity of Marie (Minnie) Antoinette and Queen Elizabeth I and other legendary types from history. The frames have also been carefully chosen and are an indispensable part of the artworks.

While painting the works for the exhibition, Robert realizes that Minnie’s body is black, that she has a white face and wears white gloves. This reminded him of the Black & White Minstrels, white and Afro-American actors performed during the Minstrel shows with black face paint (blackface) to mock Afro-Americans. They were popular from the 1930s to the 70s. Walt Disney created Mickey & Minnie in the 1930s at the height of the popularity of the Minstrels and at the same time some critics accused him of racism, which he always denied.

The paintings by Robert J. Halls are hilarious and also a commentary on racism at this time in our society.

Opening: Saturday, December 1, 17:00 – 20:00.
in the presence of the artist.
Exhibition up to and including January 12, 2019
The GO Gallery is open between Christmas and New Year’s Eve.

For more information about the exhibition, a pleasant interview with the artist, or visual material, please contact us.